U.S. Bank Launches a New Altitude Credit Card


U.S. Bank has launched a new Altitude credit card aimed at the value-minded consumer who spends money closer to home.

Among the most notable features of the new $0-annual-fee U.S. Bank Altitude Go Visa Signature Card: It earns 4 points per dollar spent at restaurants. That’s a huge rewards rate for a card with no annual fee.

Here’s a closer look at the Altitude cards. You do not need to be a U.S. Bank customer to apply.

U.S. Bank Altitude Go Visa Signature Card

Bonus: Get 20,000 points when you spend $1,000 in the first 90 days.

APR offer: 0% introductory APR on purchases and balance transfers for the first 12 billing cycles. After that, the APR is variable.

  • 4 points per dollar spent on dining and takeout.

  • 2 points per dollar spent at grocery stores, gas stations and on streaming services.

  • 1 point per dollar spent on all other eligible purchases.

  • $15 credit for annual streaming services purchases such as Netflix and Spotify. Terms apply.

  • No foreign transaction fee.

U.S. Bank Altitude Reserve Visa Infinite Card

Bonus: 50,000 points after spending $4,500 in the first 90 days — worth $750 if redeemed for travel booked through U.S. Bank

  • 5 points per dollar spent points on prepaid hotels and car rentals booked directly in the Altitude Rewards Center.

  • 3 points per dollar spent on travel purchases.

  • 3 points per dollar spent on mobile wallet purchases.

  • 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.

  • Travel credit: $325 annually. The credit is applied automatically to spending directly with airlines, hotels, car rental companies, taxis, limousines, passenger trains and cruise line companies.

  • Up to $100 in statement credit every four years to reimburse the application fee for either TSA PreCheck or Global Entry.

  • 12 free Gogo in-flight Wi-Fi passes per year.

  • Airport lounge access through Priority Pass Select — limited to four visits per year, but includes one guest each time.

  • No foreign transaction fee.



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